Parent FAQs

  1. What is dyslexia?
  2. How do I determine if my child is dyslexic or has any learning difficulities? 
  3. What are some clues that my child may have a learning disorder other than dyslexia?
  4. Why is evaluation important?
  5. Where can I go to get my child tested for dyslexia?
  6. My child was just diagnosed with dyslexia and I am feeling overwhelmed. What is the next step?
  7. How can I help my child be successful?
  8. Which reading instruction is most effective for students with dyslexia?
  9. Do Neuhaus Dyslexia Therapists teach a Structured Literacy curriculum?
  10. How do I know if the Basic Language Skills curriculum is appropriate for my child?
  11. What is a Certified Academic Language Therapist (CALT)?
  12. What does it mean to be "Neuhaus-trained?"
  13. I suspect my child is struggling with attention and concentration issues. How can I determine if these struggles are impacting my child's learning?
  14. What are the laws regarding students with dyslexia?
  15. Section 504 - What does it mean?
  16. What should I consider when choosing a school for my child with dyslexia?
  17. My child is in high school. Is it too late?
  18. My child is going to college soon. What are some resources to help him/her succeed?
  19. I am an adult and may have dyslexia. How can I get help to improve my reading and spelling?
  20. What NOT to do!

1. What is dyslexia?

An individual with dyslexia usually has several, not just one or two, of the characteristics listed below. These characteristics usually persist over time and interfere with his or her learning. If your child is having difficulties learning to read and you have noted several of these characteristics in your child, he or she may need to be evaluated for dyslexia and/or a related disorder.

Difficulty with oral language
  • Late in learning to talk
  • Difficulty in pronouncing words
  • Difficulty acquiring vocabulary or using age-appropriate grammar
  • Difficulty following directions
  • Confusion with before/after, right/left, etc.
  • Difficulty learning the alphabet, nursery rhymes, or songs
  • Difficulty understanding concepts and relationships
  • Difficulty with word retrieval or naming problems
Difficulty with reading
  • Difficulty learning to read
  • Difficulty identifying or generating rhyming words or counting syllables in words (Phonological Awareness)
  • Difficulty with hearing and manipulating sounds in words (Phonemic Awareness)
  • Difficulty distinguishing different sounds in words (Auditory Discrimination)
  • Difficulty in learning the sounds of letters
  • Difficulty remembering names and/or the order of letters when reading
  • Misreading or omitting common little words
  • "Stumbling" through or guessing at longer words
  • Poor reading comprehension during oral or silent reading
  • Slow, laborious oral reading
Difficulty with written language
  • Trouble putting ideas on paper
  • Many spelling mistakes
  • Doing well on weekly spelling tests, but continuing to have many spelling mistakes in daily work
  • Difficulty in proofreading

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2. How do I determine if my child is dyslexic or has any learning difficulties?

When a child is struggling to read, someone will probably suggest that he or she be tested for dyslexia. It is important that a full and complete evaluation of your child be done, not just a screening.  If your child is in public school, you can request that the school district evaluate your child.  The request for testing must be made in writing and submitted to the administration at your child’s school. If your child is in a private school, you have the right to request testing from the school district that your child is zoned to attend, or you can seek an educational evaluation from a private psychologist or educational diagnostician.

You have the right to pursue private testing, however, keep in mind that if your child attends public school, they are required to consider your outside testing, but they are not required to accept the testing and provide services based on the private testing results. 

Evaluation is a more accurate word to describe the process of determining if someone has dyslexia. The word evaluation encompasses identification, screening, testing, diagnosis, and all the other information gathering involved when the student, his or her family, and a team of professionals work together to determine why the student is having difficulty and what can be done to help.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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3. What are some clues that my child may have a learning disorder other than dyslexia?

Full and complete psycho-educational testing is important to determine any or all of the challenges your child may be experiencing with the learning process. See FAQ #4 about evaluations.

Dyslexia is one type of learning disability. Some students may also have other difficulties in addition to dyslexia that interfere with the learning process. Other difficulties may be: 

Dyscalculia - a mathematical disability in which a person hs unusual difficulty solving arithmetic problems and grasping math concepts. Symptoms may include:

  • Difficulty counting accurately
  • Number reversals (sometimes)
  • Difficulty memorizing math facts
  • Difficulty copying math problems and organizing written work
  • Many calculation errors
  • Difficulty retaining math vocabulary and/or concepts
Dysgraphia - a condition of impaired handwriting which can interfere with learning to spell words when writing and in speed of writing text. Children with dysgraphia may exhibit the following struggles:

  • Uncertainty about right or left-handedness
  • Poor or slow handwriting
  • Messy and unorganized papers
  • Difficulty copying
  • Poor fine motor skills
  • Spelling inaccuracy
  • Grammar and punctuation inaccuracy
  • Lack of clarity or organization of written expression
Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) can and do impacy learning but they are not learning disabilities. An individual can have more than one learning or behavorial disability. In various studies, as many as 50% of those diagnosed with a learning or reading disability have also been diagnosed with ADHD. Although disabilities may co-occur, one is not the case of the other. Symptoms include:

  • Inattention
  • Inconsistent attention, based on interest leavel
  • Distractibility
  • Impulsiveness
  • Over-activity
  • Loses papers
  • Poor sense of time
  • Forgets homework
  • Messy desk
  • Overwhelmed by too much input
  • Works slowly
  • Things are "out of sight, out of mind"
Other difficulities: Some other factors to be aware of that may signal that your child is struggling with the learning process include:
  • DIfficulty naming colors, objects, and letters (rapid naming)
  • Memory problems
  • Needs to see or hear concepts many times in order to learn them
  • Distracted by visual stimuli
  • Downward trend in achievement test scores or school performance
  • Inconsistent schoolwork
  • Teacher and/or parents say, "If only she would try harder," or "He's lazy."
  • Relatives may have similar problems
Full and complete psycho-educational testing is important in order to determine all of the challendes your child may be experiencing with the learning process. We also encourage you to read Just the Facts: Assessment of Dyslexia.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

 

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4. Why is evaluation important?

An evaluation is the process of gathering information to identify the factors contributing to a student's difficulty with learning to read and spell. First, information is gathered from parents and teachers to understand development and the educational opportunities that have been provided. Then, tests are given to identify strengths and weaknesses that lead to a diagnosis and a tentative road map for intervention. Conclusions and  recommendations are developed and reported. 

When a student is having difficulties with reading and spelling, an evaluation is important for three reasons:

  1. Diagnosis: An effective evaluation identifies the likely source of the problem. It rules out other common causes of reading difficulties and determines if the student profile of strengths and weaknesses fit the definition of dyslexia.

  2. Intervention planning: An effective evaluation develops a focused remedial program. Students who have a specific learning disability in reading (dyslexia) need a specialized approach to reading instruction to make progress. It is crucial that this specialized instruction begin at the student’s current level of reading skill development, rather than at the student’s grade level. An effective evaluation helps parents and teachers see which specific skills are weak and where reading and spelling instruction should begin.

  3. Documentation: An effective evaluation documents the history of a student’s learning disability. One purpose of this documentation is to determine eligibility for special services, including special education. Documentation is important for obtaining necessary accommodations in elementary and secondary school for class work, exams and standardized testing. It may also lead to qualifying for accommodations on college entrance exams (ACT, SAT), for college course work, and beyond.

    If your child is in public school, you can request that the school district evaluate your child.  The request for testing must be made in writing and submitted to the administration at your child’s school.  If your child is in a private school, you have the right to request testing from the school district that your child is zoned to attend. 

    You have the right to pursue private testing, however, keep in mind that if your child attends public school, they are required to consider your outside testing, but they are not required to accept the testing and provide services based on the private testing results. 

Houston area parents, call the Neuhaus Family Support Office (713-664-7676) or contact us for referrals to professionals that we have vetted and recommend for evaluating struggling students.

If you are a parent outside of the Houston area, please contact your local branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) for local referrals. 

We also encourage you to read Just the Facts: Assessment of Dyslexia.

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5. Where can I go to get my child tested for dyslexia?

If your child is in public school, you can request that the school district evaluate your child. The request for testing must be made in writing and submitted to the administration at your child’s school. If your child is in a private school, you have the right to request testing from the school district that your child is zoned to attend. For more information, refer to the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update.  (Chapter 3, page 21).

How about Private testing?
For psycho-educational testing outside the school system you can contact an educational diagnostician or psychologist who specializes in educational testing for a “full psycho-educational battery” of tests to discover you child’s strengths as well as his/her weaknesses. You have the right to pursue private testing, however, keep in mind that if your child attends public school, they are required to consider your outside testing, but they are not required to accept the testing and provide services based on the private testing results. 

Houston area parents, call the Neuhaus Family Support Office (713-664-7676) or contact us for referrals to professionals that we have vetted and recommend for evaluating struggling students.

If you are a parent outside of the Houston area, please contact your local branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) for local referrals. 

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6. My child was just diagnosed with dyslexia and I am feeling overwhelmed. What is the next step?

Start by learning all you can about dyslexia and appropriate reading instruction.

  1. Download the booklet You Can Help Your Child that we have put together for parents.
  2. Register to attend the Parent Information Session. We offer this free session twice a month in-person at Neuhaus or as a webinar.  This two-hour session is designed specifically to help parents navigate the process and make a plan to help their child.
  3. Read more about dyslexia and related disorders from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) including the following fact sheets Assessment of Dyslexia, Dyslexia Basics and Spelling.
  4. Parents of students who attend public schools in Texas need to know about the Texas Dyslexia Law. Here is the link to the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update for you to reference. You will have a better understanding on how schools evaluate students with dyslexia and what the appropriate services look like. 
  5. Refer to our list of reliable online resources. Not all the information on the Internet is accurate or science-based. These are just a few of the reliable online resources that Neuhaus Education Center recommends. 
  6. We Can Help! Contact our Family Support Office to speak with one of our FSO Coordinators who can help answer your questions and provide appropriate referrals. You may also call (713) 664-7676. 

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7. How can I help my child be successful?

First, seek an evaluation from a qualified professional either from your public school or a private evaluator

Most children can improve their literacy skills with the help of a specialized, trained instructor. The instructor should present a multisensory, structured literacy program, which is systematic, cumulative, deliberate and diagnostic. A structured Literacy program will teach phonology (sound system of language), sound-symbol recognition, syllables, morphology, syntax, semantics, and how they work together to achieve effective literacy skills.  Your child may qualify to receive dyslexia instruction at their public school or may work privately with a trained dyslexia therapist.

As a parent, you can read to your child to help them develop listening skills and an appreciation for books. The exposure to text will grow their vocabulary, build their world knowledge, and enhance their comprehension skills. This can take the form of you reading to your child, or shared reading with your child. ouc an also take advantage of recorded audiobooks like those from Learning Ally. For middle and high school students, Neuhaus Academy provides resources.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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8. Which reading instruction is most effective for students with dyslexia ?

A reading program that is researched-based, multisensory, and provides structured literacy instruction.  The program must be intentional, systematic and cumulative in its delivery. The components of instruction include:

  • Phonology: the speech and sound system of language
  • Sound-symbol association: The relationship between letter names and the sounds made by them
  • Syllable instruction: recognizing syllable types and applying syllable division rules to break up longer multisyllabic words
  • Morphology: the meaningful part of words
  • Syntax: The form and structure of sentences
  • Semantics: words meanings and word relationship
Read additional resources about dyslexia and related disorders from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) including the following fact sheets Assessment of Dyslexia, Effective Reading Instruction and Structured Literacy. We also recommend the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update, Chapter 4, pg. 39 for you to reference. 

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

 

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9. Do Neuhaus Dyslexia Therapists teach a Structured Literacy curriculum?

The Neuhaus Basic Language Skills course uses an intensive, therapeutic curriculum that meets the guidelines of the Texas Dyslexia Law and is effective for students with dyslexia and other related disorders. This evidence-based curriculum shares similar philosophies and characteristics with other Orton-Gillingham-based curricula and provides structured literacy instruction in phonemic awareness, letter recognition, decoding, spelling, fluency, comprehension, handwriting, vocabulary, and oral and written expression. It is designed to be taught by a dyslexia specialist as a 50-60 minute session four or five times a week.

Read the Structured Literacy Fact Sheet from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA).

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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10. How do I know if the Basic Language Skills curriculum is appropriate for my child?

After your child has been tested by a professional for learning difficulties, the evaluator will include recommendations in his/her report. Basic Language Skills (BLS) would be appropriate if the recommendations included such things as:

  • a multisensory presentation involving the visual, auditory and tactile/kinesthetic modalities;
  • a highly structure and systematic approach with consistent review of previously presented concepts;
  • explicit training in developing skills related to phonological processing (rhyming, segmenting and blending);
  • explicit teaching of sound/symbol correspondence and the rules that govern the structure language; and
  • it is important that the therapist/​teacher have the appropriate training to implement one of the multisensory structured language programs.
BLS is appropriate because it integrates all the above with structured, sequential instruction in decoding, handwriting, spelling, fluency, reading comprehension, written expression, and vocabulary.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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11. What is a Certified Academic Language Therapist (CALT)?

A CALT is a person that has graduated from Level 2 of Neuhaus Education Center's Preparation Programs or another accredited, multisensory reading intervention program and has passed the national registration examination to qualify for certification by the Alliance for Accreditation and Certification.  As of December, 2012, CALTs may apply for licensure by the state of Texas. Licensure will be granted to those individuals who are CALTs with a Master’s degree. 

Read the Helpful Terminology Fact Sheet from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA).

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12. What does it mean to be "Neuhaus-trained?"

The phrase Neuhaus-trained refers to individuals who have either completed or are actively enrolled in Neuhaus Education Center Dyslexia Therapist Preparation Program (DTPP). After completing their training these individuals work with students either in a private practice setting or with students in the school setting while some do both. The preparation program’s training qualifies an individual to teach the Basic Language Skills, Developing Metacognitive Skills and other curriculum. These participants learn the nature of literacy acquisition, the facets of domains of language, the characteristics of dyslexia, diagnostic teaching practices, and the structure and patterns of English for reading and spelling.  Graduates employ these strategies for developing oral language and comprehension. Participants have extensive coursework and supervised practica leading to a certification for teachers and therapists working with dyslexia and other related disorders.  The Neuhaus Education Center training program is accredited by the International Multisensory Structured Language Education Council (IMSLEC) and the International Dyslexia Association (IDA). The Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators only make referrals to individuals who are currently enrolled in, or have already completed, the Neuhaus Dyslexia Therapist Preparation Program or a similar training program. 

Neuhaus Education Center offers a variety of classes for educators or parents who want to develop or improve their skills in teaching reading, writing, and spelling. Some individuals take one 3-hour class and others complete many classes but are not enrolled in the DTPP. While they have gained knowledge about certain aspects of Neuhaus curricula, they are not qualified to teach the Basic Language Skills curriculum and are not on our referral list.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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13. I suspect my child is struggling with attentionand concentration issues. How can I determine if these struggles are impacting my child's learning??

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), is one of the most common developmental problems, affecting 3–5% of the school population. It is characterized by inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity and/or impulsivity. It is estimated that 30% of those with dyslexia have coexisting ADHD. Coexisting means the two conditions ADHD and dyslexia can occur together, but they do not cause each other.  An evaluation for ADHD is carried out by a medical doctor or a psychologist. It is helpful to have your child evaluated by a professional who can assess multiple areas to determine the causes of their struggles rather than having been looked at by multiple people. This evaluation should include the following:

  • complete medical and family history;
  • physical examination;
  • interviews with parents and child;
  • behavior rating scales completed by parents and teachers;
  • observation of the child; and
  • tests to measure intellectual potential, social and emotional adjustment, as well as to assess for the presence of learning disabilities, such as dyslexia.
Read the ADHD Fact Sheet from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA). 

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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14. What are the laws regarding students with dyslexia?

The search for a private school is something that is as individualized and unique as your child! You need to find the school that is the best fit for your child and your family. A resource for the Houston area is www.houstonprivateschools.org. There is a section on the left-hand side of the home page where you can narrow down your search based on specific criteria, such as “Schools with Special Programs” or “Schools with Religious Affiliations.”  Outside the Houston area, try to narrow your search by using the National Association of Independent Schools website - www.nais.org.  In addition, the Family Support Office can refer you to individuals who do private educational counseling.

The Family Support Office at Neuhaus hosts free information presentations twice each month. In the program, we discuss learning and reading challenges, especially dyslexia, multisensory, structured literacy instruction, and the Texas dyslexia legislation including information on resources available at Neuhaus and in the community. Parents, educators, and other professionals can benefit from this presentation.

There are federal and state laws that guide the identification and services available for students with dyslexia.

Special Education (IDEA)
Since the 1970s, Special Education laws (IDEA) have recognized dyslexia as a Specific Learning Disability (SLD).  Since that time, identification of dyslexia and effective reading intervention for dyslexia have improved greatly as a result of hundreds of research studies. In Texas and most other states, those studies have resulted in implementation of state laws and policies that specifically address identification and intervention for dyslexic students.

In Texas, the dyslexia law is usually implemented under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.  Dyslexia intervention can also be part of a student’s IEP under Special Education. You will have a better understanding on how schools evaluate students with dyslexia and what the appropriate services look like. The Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update (Appendix D, page 113) will give you the information that schools should follow for dyslexia identification and remediation.

As of 2020, legislators in 48 of the United States recognize dyslexia as a reading disability that requires evaluation and intervention in the form of structured literacy delivered by a qualified instructor.  The National Center for Improving Literacy website gives a summary of the legislation in each state. https://improvingliteracy.org/state-of-dyslexia

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15. Section 504 - What does it mean?

Section 504 is a sub-section of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and part of the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008. It is an unfunded law that simply states that "a person cannot be discriminated against for a disability that substantially affects a major life activity, such as walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, thinking, working, caring for oneself, and performing manual tasks." This law addresses accommodations and modifications, not remediation.

In Texas, however, there is specific dyslexia legislation that may be implemented under Section 504. Under state law, all kindergarten and first grade students will be screened for risk of reading failure. Students identified as “at risk” will be monitored and evaluated for dyslexia if they meet certain criteria. For more information, refer to the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update (Appendix D, page 113).  Children with a learning disability, who no longer meet Special Education (IDEA) eligibility criteria, may still be eligible for accommodations under Section 504. A few examples of accommodations may include preferential seating in the classroom, extended time on tests, and peer note-takers.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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16. What should I consider when choosing a school for my child with dyslexia?

Regardless of school choice, if your child is struggling to learn to read, s/he needs to be evaluated to get a clear picture of the struggle and the solution. Once you understand the problem, you can look for the best solution. 

Public school responsibility
Since the 1970s, Special Education laws have recognized dyslexia as a Specific Learning Disability (SLD).  Since that time, identification of dyslexia and effective reading intervention for dyslexia have improved greatly as a result of hundreds of research studies. In Texas and most other states, those studies have resulted in implementation of state laws and policies that specifically address identification and intervention for dyslexic students.

In Texas, the dyslexia law is usually implemented under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.  Dyslexia intervention can also be part of a student’s IEP under Special Education. The Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update will give you the information that schools should follow for dyslexia identification and remediation.

As of 2020, legislators in 48 of the United States recognize dyslexia as a reading disability that requires evaluation and intervention in the form of structured literacy delivered by a qualified instructor.  The National Center for Improving Literacy website gives a summary of the legislation in each state. https://improvingliteracy.org/state-of-dyslexia

Private school
While most private schools provide more individual attention for students by virtue of their size, private schools are not required to follow the guidelines of the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update or Special Education legislation. They may provide accommodations for students with learning differences but are not required to do so. 

Some private schools are dedicated solely to educating students with learning differences. If you are looking for private schools in Houston, search www.houstonprivateschools.org. If you are outside of Houston, this website lists its choices of the 50 top schools for students with learning disabilities. A nationwide selection, these are not the only good schools of this type, but they will give you an idea of common characteristics of good schools with programs for students with learning differences. https://www.masters-in-special-education.com/50-best-private-special-needs-schools/

Homeschool
Homeschool parents of children with dyslexia need to understand dyslexia and how it affects how their children learn.  We would suggest engaging a dyslexia therapist (or possibly study to become a dyslexia therapist yourself) to most effectively teach your dyslexic child literacy skills.  A lot of time can be wasted on trial and error approaches. As a homeschool parent, learn about effective reading curriculum for teaching students with dyslexia. Read the Structured Literacy Fact Sheet and Home Schooling Fact Sheet from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA).

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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17. My child is in high school. Is it too late? 

First, if s/he has not already been tested, do it now. According to the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update (Chapter 3, page 23), “parents have the right to request a referral for a dyslexia evaluation at any time.” A referral is not, however, a guarantee of an evaluation. Knowing and understanding the problem will guide the solution. The diagnosis of dyslexia can be like a prescription for glasses. it will help define the problem and lead to intervention and /or accommodations that will facilitate learning if s/he does not meet the criteria for testing at school, contact us for recommendations for private educational evaluation.

An online option to improve reading, spelling, and vocabulary is Neuhaus Academy. It is a free resource for older students and adults that can be accessed online with adequate internet access. Students work at their own pace through a series of lessons, each of which is based on a multisyllable word; lesson parts include syllable division and pronunciation, meanings of word parts and roots, vocabulary building, and developing world knowledge.

For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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18. My child is going to college soon. What are some resources to help him/her succeed?

  1. It is most important for students with learning disabilities to communicate with the disabilities/study skills office at the college or university to which s/he is applying. They will share information about how to qualify for appropriate accommodations or services.

  2. For people living in the Houston area, we urge you to register for one of our College Share sessions. We hold one in the fall and one in the spring. They are designed to provide helpful information to college-bound high school students with learning differences, to their parents, and to professionals in the field of education. Speakers are invited to present such topics as choosing a college, legal rights, and alternatives to pursuing a bachelor’s degree.

  3. In early January of each year, we partner with the Houston Branch of the International Dyslexia Association (HBIDA) and The Briarwood School to host a College Panel for Students with Learning Differences. College students with learning differences and/or ADHD share tips and strategies for success in college before an audience of college-bound high school students and their parents.

  4. Read about one dyslexic student’s strategies for college success in this free online booklet, Tips for College Success, by Nigel the Fox, presented by Amir Bar.

  5. It is most important for students with learning disabilities to advocate for themselves in college. Elizabeth Hamblet, LDT-C, M.S. Ed., M.A.T. hosts the LD Advisory website with good information for making the transition to college.

  6. Read about Transitioning from High School to College and additional resources about Transitioning from High School to College Fact Sheet from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA).
For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

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19. I am an adult and may have dyslexia. How can I get help to improve my reading and spelling?

Classes at Neuhaus…
If you live in the Houston area, you should consider enrolling in the Margaret H. Ley Adult Literacy Program at Neuhaus. This program targets the dyslexic adult population, ages 18 – 80.  It is unique in that it is the only adult literacy program in the greater Houston area that offers instruction designed specifically for adult students with learning differences.  Classes meet twice per week in the evenings at Neuhaus Education Center during fall and spring semesters. Through a screening process, students are placed in classes according to reading level.  The program can accommodate a range of reading levels from a total non-reader to that of a college graduate who wants to improve spelling and written expression. 

Call Neuhaus Education Center at 713-664-7676 and ask for the Adult Literacy Program director.

An online option to improve reading, spelling, and vocabulary is Neuhaus Academy. It is a free resource for older students and adults that can be accessed online with adequate internet access. Students work at their own pace through a series of lessons, each of which is based on a multisyllable word; lesson parts include syllable division and pronunciation, meanings of word parts and roots, vocabulary building, and developing world knowledge.

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20. What NOT to do!

There are scores of “remedies” for dyslexia that have been invented and marketed to parents as cures, but these programs are not based on science.  When considering an intervention for struggling readers, first consider the recommendation of a professional organizations like these.

 

  1. The International Dyslexia Association (IDA), read this IDA Fact Sheet: When Educational Promises are Too Good To Be True.
  2. Read this statement from The American Academy of Ophthalmology about Dyslexia and Vision.
  3. Read about these Ineffective Treatments for Dyslexia in the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update (Chapter 4, page 53).
  4. It is also important to know how the science of reading does inform the effective instruction for dyslexia according to the Texas Dyslexia Handbook, 2018 Update (Chapter 4, pages 39-44) and Effective Reading Instruction for Students with Dyslexia Fact Sheet from the International Dyslexia Association (IDA).
For more individual information, contact the Neuhaus Family Support Coordinators or call (713) 664-7676.

 

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